March 14, 2012

Wildflower Documentary Featuring Bluebonnets

For anyone interested in bluebonnets and wildflowers in general, you should watch "Wildflowers: Seeds of History" on the KLRU website.  There's lots of fun and interesting information and discussions varying from why Texas highways are so beautiful (41:20) to natural seed banks to encouraging wildflowers on your property.

If you skip to 39:40, you can learn how to cultivate bluebonnets.

And if you want to know where to go to see bluebonnets in Texas, check out this site!

If you aren't in Texas and can't make it, here are some from my yard:









8 comments:

  1. But you Texans surely do know how to make the rest of us feel welcome! Gorgeous flowers.

    I have carried seeds home from the Lady Bird Nature Center, and ordered them on line and cannot get a single one to grown - actually no lupines grow here - the soil is too clay and our summer is more humid than yours (not quite as hot, but way more humid).

    Thanks so much for the lovely resources.

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    1. I'll try to post some ideas on how to cultivate them elsewhere - purely speculation based on how I've seen mine grow and what I know of them.

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  2. Beautiful! How fun to have them in your yard! They look fantastic! A customer brought me a maroon one the other day ( I went to UT so he thought he was soooo funny bringing me a maroon one. ) I told him I loved them and put them on the front porch of the office to show them off. They are very unusual in that color but very pretty, though I do love the classic blue the best. (and not cause the maroon "are" A&M. I just like the blue better.) Great shots!

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    1. The maroon ones are great, but they have to be isolated from the blue ones because blue is a dominate gene which I suppose is good for you because you like the blue - I also like the blue but wouldn't mind some white ones.

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  3. These are so gorgeous...love that shade of blue! Blue flowers (short of plumbago) are so rare here, it is beautiful to see!!!

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    1. Blue is quite rare! I think that's part of the joy.

      I'm hoping for a blue lantana. The purple ones are nice, but blue would be amazing.

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  4. Your bluebonnets look so vibrant and healthy. Gorgeous pictures, I love the one with the bee!

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    1. Thank you! The bluebonnets definitely have a preference for where they'll grow in the yard.

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