July 26, 2011

Plumeria Love

A couple of my plumerias are blooming, and I've already shown a picture of one for this month's Garden Bloggers Bloom Day post.  Still, it's a plant that deserves a bit more attention than a single photo.


Unfortunately I don't have a name on this one.  I think I bought it as a white or a pink or something.  I got it last year, and it didn't bloom.  This spring I discovered why it hadn't bloomed - the drainage was abysmal.  When I repotted it, I actually looked up what kind of soil and pot to use.  Thankfully, the Plumeria Society of America has a recipe and recommendations for potting plumeria.  I liked the soil recipe so much that I used it for a few other tropical plants.  It's a cheap one to make, feels great in the hands, and does a really nice job.



The smell on this one is more like a floral perfume than the other one in bloom (not shown).  I can definitely see the appeal in collecting plumerias just for the variety in scents.  My other one in bloom (not shown) smells like a custardy mango floral dessert.  I smelled one other (not mine) that was like a spicy vanilla.  I have one other that's yet to bloom for me, and I'm very curious about how that one will smell.


Careful where you shove your nose when trying to get a whiff.  You might inhale more than what you bargained for.





13 comments:

  1. Beautiful! I don't really know plumeria, and now I'm really intrigued. Your scent descriptions sound great.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Iris - You should definitely get some plumeria. They're shockingly easy to grow (if you use the plumeria society of america recommendations), and even though they aren't hardy, they're very easy to overwinter. I think Natural Gardener has a few right now along with a GIANT one that isn't for sale - it's over by the greenhouse, and there's always a nice variety at ZilkerFest.

    ReplyDelete
  3. How do you over-winter them? I have a large shed that stays above freezing, but is pretty low light in the winter. Think that might work? (zone 7)

    ReplyDelete
  4. webb - I shove mine in the garage in a dark corner and don't water it at all. It will go almost completely dormant like a bulb. I know people who will also overwinter only cuttings and don't bother to bring in a pot or root ball. So long as it stays above freezing, I'm sure it's fine. You could shove it in cellar if you wanted. It really doesn't require any light or water during the winter. It'll look pretty scary, but it'll recover in the spring. :)

    ReplyDelete
  5. Sneaky little fellow in the three photos, I bet he thought you missed him. This would be a plant to try. I already have many plants I overwinter, so what is one more. Nice it has a fragrance, always a plus.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Never knew much about plumeria thank you for sharing. I love fragrent plants. You asked on my blog what lens I used for those butterfly photos. I used an Canon 180mm macro lens with ambient light and flash for fill on all but the last photo. The last photo was taken an inch away with a Nikon Coolpix point and shoot.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Plumeria are one of my favorites! I have two right now, one that has blooms of pale pink to a dark shade and one that is supposed to be red that hasn't bloomed yet. I was told that they take 3-5 years to bloom, so I'm hoping next year is the big year for the red one! My mother sent me home with seeds of maybe 5/6 varieties, so I'm going to try my hand at that. Love them!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Inhaling now, trying to get a whiff of that delectable scent of mango custard! Very pretty.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Pretty shade of pink!!! Glad you got your soil right and now this gorgeous plant is thriving!!! Yeah!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Plumeria are my one of my favorite. Also one of the few survivors of last winter, since I drug them all the way indoors. (Bad greenhouse collapse during the snow.)

    ReplyDelete
  11. GWGT - I think the fragrance of plumeria is partially what got my SO interested in gardening. Well, at least somewhat interested.

    Randy - I'm quite impressed you were able to get so close to those butterflies! I thought you might have been using a 300mm lens!

    Mandy - I'm glad you like them too! I'd love to see your red one when it blooms!

    HolleyGarden - The other one I has a better fragrance than the one in this post, but I prefer the flowers on this one to the other one. I wish I had smell-o-vision on blogger!

    Julie - Thanks! The soil has been a huge help!

    Tufa - Horrible winter disasters scare me. A lot. So sorry about what happened to you but I'm glad you at least had one that survived. :)

    ReplyDelete
  12. My 6 year old plumeria tree is becoming stunted and the branches have an odd color due to a bad infestation of spider mites. I have faithfully fertilized it and sprayed the affected areas, but I am concerned I'm going to lose the tree. It has blossomed only one autumn with beautiful pink tipped flowers and I hope to have more years of those fabulous blossoms. Do you have any advice on how to save my tree?

    ReplyDelete
  13. My 6 year old plumeria tree has been outside the last few summers and, instead of being dragged inside last winter, was kept in a small greenhouse. It has a bad case of spider mite infestation which is seriously stunting this year's growth and although I have faithfully fertilized it and sprayed its sickly leaves, I am concerned that it is going to succumb. It would be a shame as it has bloomed only once and the pink edged flowers were plentiful and fragrant. I am open to suggestions on how to help my tree. By the way, I'm in Oregon.

    ReplyDelete

Every time you leave a comment, an angel gets his wings!